According to The Spokesman-Review, there is good news for Montana's wolf population. However, the same cannot be said about Idaho's wolf population. It's a heated topic in these parts, so read on. -Michelle

ENDANGERED SPECIES — Montana's wolf population increased about 8 percent in 2010 while Idaho's decreased about 16 percent, according to reports released today by state wildlife agencies and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Montana has just announced that at least 566 wolves inhabit the state, according to the 2010 annual wolf conservation and management report released today by Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks.

The report shows Montana's minimum wolf population increased about 8 percent in 2010, compared to a 4 percent increase last year and an 18 percent increase in 2008. The minimun numbers indicate that wolves have increased to 108 verified packs and 35 breeding pairs.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service followed Montana by posting the complete 2010 Northern Rockies wolf update, which includes the census from Idaho and Wyoming.

The report by Idaho Fish and Game biologists documented a minimum of 705 wolves in 87 packs at the end of 2010. In addition, they documented 22 border packs along boundaries with Montana, Wyoming and Washington.

Of the 54 Idaho packs known to have reproduced, 46 qualified as breeding pairs by the end of the year. These reproductive packs produced a minimum of 189 pups in 2010.

For 2009, Idaho reported a minimum population of 843 wolves in 94 packs in the state along wtih 20 documented border packs

Idaho's decline is at least partly due to the difficulty of monitoring wolves in remote areas of central Idaho, federal officials said.

Click here for the latest map showing confirmed wolf breeding packs in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington and Wyoming.

via Montana wolf numbers up 8 percent in 2010, Idaho's down 16 percent - Outdoors blog - Spokesman.com - March 11, 2011.