This is one of my fave events. This Sunday, the Fieldhouse is packed with locally made products and the artists that create them. Plus, it's FREE to attend the Bozeman MADE Fair.

So, yes. It's free to attend the Bozeman MADE Fair from 11am to 5pm but YOU CAN buy your way in early if you'd like to do some 'less crowded' shopping and get the first crack at the goods.

For just $10, you can purchase a VIP early entry ticket that will get you in the doors at 10am...a full hour earlier than the general crowd. Plus, all of that VIP ticket money is going to be donated to THRIVE this year. Cool deal.

There is free parking at the MSU Fieldhouse so you don't have to worry about shelling out money for that either. Save all those bucks for the cool stuff you'll find inside at the Bozeman MADE Fair this Sunday. Plus, it's Halloween. You deserve some goodies for yourself, right?

If you're able, bring a non-perishable food item for the Gallatin Valley Food Bank. This event is special not just because of the great vendors, but because they try very hard to benefit the community as much as possible. (The food drive on-site, the VIP ticket sale money being donated, etc...)

Hours of the Bozeman MADE Fair are 11am to 5pm this Sunday, October 31st. (But if you buy that VIP ticket above, you'll get in at 10am.)

There's a special Trick-or-Treating event at 1pm WITHIN the event. In addition, there's a costume contest that's open to all ages. Prizes will be awarded so if you'll be wearing a costume later in the day, why not wear it to the Fieldhouse? You might walk away a winner.

What to expect at the Bozeman MADE Fair? Just about everything, which is why it's so cool. You'll find inexpensive items such as soaps, jewelry, sauces, and wooden boxes to incredibly high-quality leather goods and heirloom furniture. Truly, there's something for everyone.

With all those imported goods sitting on container ships outside our ports...what BETTER reason to shop locally this year for the holidays?

PHOTOS: Garden of 1,000 Buddhas In Montana

Take a look at The Ewam Garden of 1,000 Buddhas in Arlee, Montana.